jump to navigation

Open Source Code: Using XBox Kinect with the LabVIEW Robotics Starter Kit May 25, 2011

Posted by emiliekopp in code, labview robot projects.
Tags: , , , , , , ,
add a comment

This example features sensor fusion, using the Kinect to gather the 3D image of the world and a scanning sonar to help avoid obstacles that get too close for the Kinect to see.

Check out the full recipe on the NI Robotics Code Exchange, including hardware lists, software and setup requirements, as well as code descriptions and downloads.

Download: Using the XBox Kinect with LabVIEW Robotics Starter Kit

More LabVIEW Development for the Xbox Kinect April 7, 2011

Posted by emiliekopp in code, labview robot projects.
Tags: , , , , , , ,
3 comments

So remember when I said the Xbox Kinect was going to revolutionize robotics (at least from a sensor-hardware point of view)?

Well, when it rains, it pours: More and more LabVIEW developers are uniting, creating and sharing drivers that allow you to communicate with the Xbox Kinect hardware using LabVIEW software.

An NI Community member, anfredres86, has published his VI driver library, making it easy to download and install the necessary files for you to start developing robotics applications in LabVIEW that utilize the Kinect hardware for robot sensing.

Here is a video of the 2D occupancy grid mapping example he put together using LabVIEW and the Kinect:

I encourage everyone to check out (and download) his code:

Kinect Drivers for Labview: http://decibel.ni.com/content/docs/DOC-15655

And be sure to share your examples on the NI Robotics Code Exchange as well!

Xbox Kinect Hack Using LabVIEW March 7, 2011

Posted by emiliekopp in code, labview robot projects.
Tags: , , , , , ,
3 comments

If you haven’t seen this already, you need to. The Xbox Kinect is not only revolutionizing gaming, it will revolutionize the way humans interact with machines, including robots (think: robots can now more easily interpret human gestures).

Ryan Gordon, from http://ryangordon.net/, got things started by building and sharing a LabVIEW wrapper for the OpenKinect library. Then John Wu, another LabVIEW programmer, took things one step further building an example VI for 3D scene construction using the Kinect sensor and point clouds.

Download John’s example on his blog post: LabVIEW, Xbox Kinect, and 3D point cloud visualization

Thank you John and Ryan! This is the beginning of some incredible and exciting work!

Open Source Project: Robot Swarm October 13, 2010

Posted by emiliekopp in code, labview robot projects.
Tags: , , , , ,
1 comment so far

We all know programming just one mobile robot with artificial intelligence is hard. So adding more robots and having them exhibit a collective behavior can increase the difficultly level exponentially. This is what makes swarm intelligence such hot topic in the world of robotics today.

During a National Instruments user conference, I saw a very impressive swarm demo from the NI Robotics R&D team:

Karl Muecke, the project lead, is now lifting the hood and opening up all of the build instructions and control code used to create his robot swarm. He starts will high level topics like hardware architectures, data communications, localization, driver station UI, obstacle avoidance and path planning, and then delves into the details in each area.

Check out the entire open source project on the NI Robotics Code Exchange and be sure to continue checking in, as he continually adds more pieces to puzzle.

NIWeek 2010 Robotic Swarm Demo

Open Source LabVIEW Code: Humanoid Robot Walking Gait May 19, 2010

Posted by emiliekopp in code, labview robot projects.
Tags: , , , ,
1 comment so far

This is the latest update to the MiNI Hubo series I started awhile back. You may recall the previouis video of MiNI Hubo walking, which used LabVIEW code that was simply playing back a recorded motion.

This video shows MiNI Hubo walking using a parametric gait generated dynamically and online:

And best of all, Karl Muecke, NI R&D engineer, is sharing all of the LabVIEW code that controls MiNI Hubo’s walking gait.

You can download the VIs and see how Karl designed the control code on the NI Robotics Code Exchange.

iPhone Controlled Car: More How-To Materials November 12, 2009

Posted by emiliekopp in code, labview robot projects.
Tags: , , , , , , , ,
add a comment

So if you’ve been following the phenomenal DIY application that has made it to sites like Gizmodo and Cars.com, you might be interested in the detailed How-To docs that the guys behind this wicked-awesome app created. Just in case you haven’t checked out their blog (which you should!), here’s some of the technical materials they’ve shared with us:

  1. Technical Tutorial: Remotely Controlled Automobile – iPhone, Power Wheels, Laptop — Includes system overview as well as a grocery list of all the hardware used
  2. Technical White Paper: Use of Prototyping tools in the “Drive a Car with an iPhone” Video — Lists the software used to rapidly prototype the control system, including LabVIEW
  3. Open Source Code: Code for iPhone Controlled Car — Download the zip file that contains the LabVIEW project and all subVIs that they used in order to control the Oldsmobile with an iPhone, Power Wheels, and Laptop

And there’s plenty more tutorials they’ve created to help explain exactly how they did it. Check them out.

 

Open Source LabVIEW Code: The RoBoard RB-100 November 3, 2009

Posted by emiliekopp in code, labview robot projects.
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,
add a comment

This tasty chunk of code comes from the RoboSavvy Forum, a great place for hobbyist and robotics enthusiasts to find low-cost robotics kits, materials and information.

Mr. Richard van der Wolf from the Netherlands created his own open-source RoBoIO library in LabVIEW, which allows you to communicate with and control the Roboard RB-100. This board is compatible with several robot kits that are already out there, including the Kondo Humanoid Robot (KHR), Hitec’s Robonova, the Robotis Bioloid and Robobuilder. In addition, if you build your own hardware platform from scratch, you have plenty of communication standard options to choose from. You can find all the info you would need on the board’s hardware here, on the RoboSavvy site.

And here’s Mr. van der Wolf’s LabVIEW code (man, I wish my name was cool like that): http://www.roboard.com/labview/Labview_RoBoIOv15b.zip

If you run into any issues, I suggest you hit up this forum thread, as it’s specific to the LabVIEW files for the RB-100. Thanks RoboSavvy!

Open Source LabVIEW Code: LIDAR Example featuring Radiohead September 15, 2009

Posted by emiliekopp in code, labview robot projects.
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,
1 comment so far

This one is compliments of Alessandro Ricco, a LabVIEW Champion in Italy who had some free time on his hands. He was inspired by Radiohead’s music video for House of Cards. Some of you may recall, this is the music video that was created without any filming, whatsoever. Rather, the producers recorded 3D images of Thom Yorke singing the lyrics with a Velodyne LIDAR sensor and then played back the data, in sync with the song.

I mentioned LIDAR technology before when describing the Blind Driver Car from Virginia Tech. There’s a ton of other robots that I’ve come across that use LIDAR for sensing and perception, so I figured you robot builders out there might be interested in getting your hands on some code to do this yourself.

Start by downloading Alessandro’s example here. You’ll need LabVIEW 8.5 or newer. If you don’t have LabVIEW, you can download free evaluation software here (be warned, it might take some time to download).

You’ll also need to find yourself some LIDAR data. If you don’t have a $20,000 LIDAR sensor lying around the lab, you can simply download the LIDAR data from the Radiohead music video from Google Code.

On the other hand, if you do have a LIDAR lying around and let’s say you want to create your own music video (or perhaps more likely, if you just want to create a video recording of the 3D data your mobile robot just acquired), Alessandro also includes a VI that saves each 3D plot as a .jpeg and then strings them all together to create an .avi. Here’s where you can find the necessary IMAQ driver VIs to do this part (be sure to download NI-IMAQ 4.1, I don’t think you’ll need the other stuff).

radiohead

Big thanks to Alessandro. His instructions, documented in his VIs, are exceptional.